Happy last Saturday of NaPoWriMo, everyone.

Our featured journal for the day is Parcel, which will soon publish NaPoWriMo-er Rachel West. Parcel is just lovely-looking, and I’m quite please to make its acquaintance. Turns out some of my favorite poets have been published there, so I just ordered a subscription. And . . . they take submissions year-round.

Today’s featured participant is simple slanting bones, which has some lovely erasure poems, and a great (and appropriately themed) lune from Day 22.

Now for our prompt (optional, as always). Today’s prompt comes to us from Vince Gotera, who wrote his “family member” poem for Day 20 in the form of a curtal sonnet. As Vince explains, the curtal sonnet is shorter than the normal, fourteen line sonnet. Instead it has a first stanza of six lines, followed by a second stanza of four, and then closes with a half-line. The form was invented in the 1800s by Gerard Manley Hopkins, who used it in his famous poem “Pied Beauty”. So for today, I challenge you to give the curtal sonnet a whirl. It doesn’t need to rhyme — though it can if you like — and feel free to branch out beyond iambic pentameter. Happy writing!

 

60 Responses to Day 26

  1. Vince Gotera says:

    Maureen, thanks for taking my suggestion. The curtal sonnet is 3/4 of a regular sonnet. If you figure out 3/4 of 14, you’ll get 10 1/2 lines, which is how long the curtal sonnet is. If you want to rhyme your curtal sonnet, Hopkins’s rhyme scheme is abcabc for the six-line stanza and then dbcdc or dcbdc for the four-and-a-half-line stanza. Have fun, everyone!

  2. CC Champagne says:

    Don’t know if I would describe it as ‘fun’ but it’s definitely something different! Here’s my attempt: http://ccchampagne.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/a-can-do-attitude/

  3. CC Champagne says:

    Don’t know if I would describe it as ‘fun’ but it’s definitely something different! Here’s my attempt: http://ccchampagne.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/a-can-do-attitude/

  4. Rachel Barenblat says:

    Oh, this is wonderful! I adore “Pied Beauty” — it is one of my favorite poems of all time — and the curtal sonnet is a delightful form to have in my toolbox. I decided to emulate Hopkins’ use of four stresses per line, too. Here’s my poem for today:

    http://velveteenrabbi.blogs.com/blog/2014/04/daily-april-poem-a-curtal-sonnet.html

  5. martha0stout says:

    Here is my offering for this prompt, I hope it is enjoyed!

    http://martha0stout.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/layabouts-day-twenty-six/

  6. Susan Chast says:

    Have I thanked you for featuring journals and websites I might otherwise never see? This is very meaningful to me. Thank you.

    Here is my curtal sonnet,which I misread as curl tail sonnet and so wrote about a bird I saw yesterday:

    RED LIGHT

    The cardinal sits still on the rusty
    fence railing behind veils of spring’s baby
    lilac leaves—watching me watching him—
    bright red flashing his masked beauty. Does he
    relate to the Roman Catholic robes
    that name him? To sports teams that claim him?

    In the stillness, my eyes search out his fawn-
    colored mate—I pray she is building here,
    then note both neighborhood toms hope so too.
    I hear his wheet-wheet-wheet-to–to-to song
    change to chip, chip as he lifts, flits and leaves.

    #

  7. […] using today’s NaPoWriMo prompt: http://www.napowrimo.net/2014/04/day-26-2/ Share this:EmailPrintRedditTumblrGoogleTwitterFacebookPinterestPocketLinkedInDiggStumbleUponLike […]

  8. Charlene Delfin says:

    Prompts are getting more and more challenging as NaPoWriMo comes to a close. Please don’t make us write epic poetry next; epic is hard to create. :D

    http://delfincharlene.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/the-reader/

  9. There is no mountain pot on my head
    I cannot make bread or water fetch God instead.
    Tell him all his children be dead…
    http://www.kneal2poetry.org

    I tried peace my fellow writers….

  10. […] NaPoWriMo prompt is to write a curtal sonnet, which is shorter than the normal, fourteen line sonnet. Instead […]

  11. […] Poetic Asides wants a water poem. And NaPoWriMo.net suggests a curtal sonnet, which I’ve never tried. (I think I should have left it that way.  I have a bad case of […]

  12. […] Day 26: NaPoWriMo Prompt: A Curtal Sonnet Share this:EmailPrintTwitterStumbleUponRedditLinkedInFacebookGooglePinterestDiggTumblrPocketLike this:Like Loading… […]

  13. […] Scrabble: NaPoWriMo asked us to write a curtal sonnet well: this has been long month of writing poetry, it seems I […]

  14. The Product Poet says:

    Day 26: A Curtal Sonnet – “Simply Us” #NaPoWriMo14 http://t.co/9mnEC3oNtF.

  15. […] NaPoWriMo, with increasing sadism, prompts the invention of a curtal (meaning cropped) sonnet, and gives, as example, one by the inventor: […]

  16. Colonialist says:

    These are becoming ever tougher to take with the dedicated seriousness I always display! :)
    http://colonialist.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/curt-really-awfully/

  17. […] Today’s prompt (I just realised that I’ve called the poem ‘Prompt’ but it has nothing to do with the prompt. I could’ve lied and tried to make a big clever link as well…) was to write a poem in the form of a curtal sonnet.  […]

  18. David Ellis (TooFullToWrite) says:

    I didn’t use the prompt but I’ve written a rocking poetic love song. Check it out here:-

    http://toofulltowrite.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/napowrimo-poem-poetry-wasted-days/

  19. […] response today, Day 26. Share this:Like this:Like Loading… 26/04/2014Jenn NaPoWriMo, […]

  20. bniedt says:

    I’m fairly happy with how mine came out, titled “Aquaphobia”: http://bniedt.blogspot.com/2014/04/todays-dual-prompts-from-poetic-asides_26.html

  21. Vince Gotera says:

    Mixing curtal sonnet prompt with Poetic Asides’s “water poem” prompt.

    Water

    I fill my glass from the faucet, get ice from the fridge,
    sit down to watch an episode of Swamp People,
    who hunt crocodiles in murky, brown water
    that makes the monsters invisible. How rich
    the ways H2O affects us, both lethal
    and harmless. Did you know we all can walk on water?

    If it’s white and crunchy. It can be unseen yet blue,
    giving sky its tint. It makes Earth a marble
    glowing aquamarine and pearl in outer
    space. None on this planet can live without you,
                                                     our trusty friend, water.

                    —Vince Gotera

    http://vincegotera.blogspot.com

  22. Kiana Donae says:

    I wrote this at the end of the day literally….I just posted to my blog at exactly midnight. http://kianadonaepoetry.weebly.com/1/post/2014/04/napowrimo14-day-26.html

  23. […] worthy work wherewithal werewolf wonder wonky wily whatever welcome winsome why wine wind wander. NaPoWriMo 2014, day 26 Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogleLike this:Like […]

  24. […] Sonnet Apr26 [NaPoWriMo–Day 26–Curtal Sonnet]    [April 2014 PAD Challenge–Day 26] Share […]

  25. worldofmymae says:

    Here’s my take on Curtal Sonnet, my very first on this form:
    http://jewelofcreations.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/napowrimo-day-26-sonnet-for-my-knight/

  26. worldofmymae says:

    Here’s my take on Curtal Sonnet, my very first on this form:
    http://jewelofcreations.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/napowrimo-day-26-sonnet-for-my-knight/

  27. worldofmymae says:

    Here’s my take on Curtal Sonnet, my very first on this form:
    http://jewelofcreations.wordpress.com/2014/04/26/napowrimo-day-26-sonnet-for-my-knight/

  28. […] NaPoWriMo cuz I was traveling again. Anyway, this is a rhyme done in curtal sonnet as mentioned in the challenge. It’s also a response to this story that claims Ronald McDonald’s new style makes him a […]

  29. I’m not doing them in order, and finding this very cathartic! I support caregivers in an online hospice group. This was inspired by a caregiver, although this was my story of helping my parents, who both confronted cancer.

    Mother, take it easy

    I nagged my mother about this kind of thing.
    Confronting her cancer, determined to be formal
    Leaning heavily, making my dad some lunch.
    Standing at the counter, visibly shaking
    She wanted to create the illusion of normal.
    Dad perfectly capable of finding something to munch.

    She used to work Saturdays, when I was a child.
    He’d do the housecleaning, acting as caregiver.
    Susie Homemaker, shakingly she’d hunch.
    I told her to save her energy for disease reviled.

    –But she would not listen.

  30. I’m not doing them in order, and finding this very cathartic! I support caregivers in an online hospice group. This was inspired by a caregiver, although this was my story of helping my parents, who both confronted cancer.

    Mother, take it easy

    I nagged my mother about this kind of thing.
    Confronting her cancer, determined to be formal
    Leaning heavily, making my dad some lunch.
    Standing at the counter, visibly shaking
    She wanted to create the illusion of normal.
    Dad perfectly capable of finding something to munch.

    She used to work Saturdays, when I was a child.
    He’d do the housecleaning, acting as caregiver.
    Susie Homemaker, shakingly she’d hunch.
    I told her to save her energy for disease reviled.

    –But she would not listen.

  31. […] NaPoWriMo #26: Curtal Sonnet | We Write Poems: Wordle #16 […]

  32. […] thought I’d mess around with the NaPoWriMo Day 26 prompt: Write a curtal sonnet. I made a bit of a mess. It’s also partly about goodbyes, which is the […]

  33. […] NaPoWriMo prompt, it comes to us from Vince Gotera, who wrote his “family member” poem for Day 20 in the […]

  34. […] Day 26: NaPoWriMo Prompt: A Curtal Sonnet // ← Dear Karma ~ Part II Duh-lick-shush → […]

  35. […] here is the NaPoWriMo prompt: Our prompt today was to write a curtal sonnet in the style of Gerard Manley Hopkins’ famous poem […]

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