Hello, everyone! Happy final Monday of NaPoWriMo and GloPoWriMo!

Our featured participant for Day 25 is Rhyme and Reason, where the mix-and-match prompt for Day 24 is folded into a versical movie review!

Today, in addition to our featured participant, I’d like to post out the websites of some participants who have not been following our prompts, but instead have been using NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo to pursue independent, themed projects! Mark Lamoureux and Chris McCreary, for example, have been collaborating on poems based on The Dictionnaire Infernal, an old French demonology book. Over at the Bloof Books blog, a number of different poets have been publishing daily poems, including editor Shanna Compton, Natalie Eilbert, and Farrah Field. For her part, Joanna Penn Cooper has been focusing mainly on diaristic prose poems, interspersed with prompt-based and collaborative work.

Our poet in translation for today is Finland’s Olli Heikkonen, whose work is intimately concerned with the interrelation between city, suburb, and countryside, between forest and town. Thirteen of his poems can be found at the link above.

And now for our (optional) prompt! Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first one), but then goes elsewhere with it. This will work best if you just start with a line of poetry you remember, but without looking up the whole original poem. (Or, find a poem that you haven’t read before and then use a line that interests you). The idea is for the original to furnish a sort of backdrop for your work, but without influencing you so much that you feel stuck just rewriting the original!. For example, you could begin, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day,” or “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons,” or “I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster,” or “they persevere in swimming where they like.” Really, any poem will do to provide your starter line – just so long as it gives you the scope to explore. Happy writing!

 

89 Responses to Day Twenty-Five

  1. […] Happy final Monday of NaPoWriMo […]

  2. Vijaya says:

    Hello,
    I’ll be travelling back to the US tomorrow (and it’ll prob. take ten hours by car), so I thought I’d write my post right after midnight, when the prompt was posted. I really do feel as if I wrote it in a fevered dream.

    https://magicsurrealist2013.me/2016/04/25/ishmael-a-dream/

    Love,
    Vijaya
    (Dreamer of Dreams)

  3. Pat R says:

    https://thoughtsandentanglements.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/urban/
    Hello Everyone, off prompt…a Tanka for today. I will probably give the prompt a try later. A good Monday to all:)

  4. […] napowrimo.net prompt is to write a poem that begins with a line from another poem. I chose the line dive to the […]

  5. I chose the line dive to the bottom of the ocean with me from ‘What to listen for in a cold war of visual cues’ by Stephanie Mason.

    https://ordinaryaveragethoughts.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/national-poetry-writing-month-day-25/

  6. […] today’s prompt, click here. The first line was taken from William Wordsmith’s poem; I wandered lonely as a […]

  7. […] Day 22 of NaPoWriMo recycles the first line of a previous poem and turns it into something new.  I chose a line from my poem that offers instruction on how to wake me up.  This time, I went in the direction of hot wings, which I simply love to eat. […]

  8. Kruti says:

    Using a line from ‘Daffodils’ by William Wordsworth, I wrote a poem on chasing butterflies, but that’s not all there is to the poem :)

    http://bit.ly/1MvFlPV

  9. […] optionale Tagesaufgabe auf NaPoWriMo.net lautete heute, ein Gedicht mit einer Zeile aus einem anderen Gedicht zu beginnen. Ich habe einen […]

  10. […] NaPoWriMo Day 25, prompt is to begin with a line from another poem. First line from Mark Jarman’s “Chimney Swifts,” which I discovered in the Bright Wings anthology. I also borrowed the title from Wallace Stevens, “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.” […]

  11. […] NaPoWriMo prompt was to use a line from a famous poem to inspire a new work. I have used the first line of […]

  12. […] prompt  was to take a line from an existing poem and just run with it. I chose a line from Pablo […]

  13. Carla Jones says:

    I borrowed from Mr Pablo Neruda. Loved this prompt.

    https://thisandotherpoems.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/glopowrimo-april-25th/

  14. Thanks for authorising me to pinch a line from Yeats and for inciting me to try out the sonnet form. Both included in this one
    https://janedougherty.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/had-i-the-cloths-of-heaven/

  15. Oh, this will be ending soon and I’m so sad about us parting already … Anyway, I’m as Homeric as ever today. :)

    http://charlene-delfin.blogspot.com/2016/04/napowrimo-2016-25th-day.html

  16. […] From the first line of U2’s ‘Seconds’, to the prompt at NaPoWriMo #25 […]

  17. […] end is nigh, dear poets – well, at least the end of NaPoWriMo. Today’s prompt: a poem incorporating an already existing […]

  18. […] Day Twenty-Five of 2016 NaPoWriMo. My entry in Hugh’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Week 22 – Group, this shot of Canada Geese was taken on Lake Ontario, at Fort Niagara State Park, Youngstown, NY. […]

  19. Kirk says:

    I used a different prompt, but here’s my poem for the day.

    Prompt: Write an exercise poem.
    “Sketchbook”

  20. […] NaPoWriMo’s “Lines from Another Poem prompt” NotaLiteraryJournal’s “Ode to Practicing prompt” Poetic Asides P-A-D “Exercise poems prompt” Poetry School’s “Definitions Prompt” Mariah Wilson’s “Getting Up Early prompt” QuillsEdge Press’ “This is What I Build prompt” Found Poetry’s “Homophonic-Interpretation prompt” Apparatus Mag’s “Conversation w/ Mark-Makers prompt” Jo Bell’s “Argument poem prompt” Indiana Humanities’ “Advertisement poems prompt” Mary Carroll-Hackett’s “Walking prompt” Kate Foley’s “Missed Connections prompt” Imaginary Garden’s “Where You Come From prompt” Tweetspeak Poetry’s “Celebrity Pillows prompt” […]

  21. Angela says:

    Not enough tiem for today’s lovely prompt. So a new one on perfectionism, again 4 lines: https://unassortedstories.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/kick-it/

  22. […] NaPoWriMo prompt for today is to write a poem that begins with a line from another poem, but then write your […]

  23. Bryan Ens says:

    What a wonderful prompt! I have chosen a line from a poem by Robert W Service.
    https://quest4peas.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/5322/

  24. […] for day 25 from http://www.napowrimo.com “write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first line), […]

  25. David Ellis says:

    I used the prompt and took a line from a Bukowski poem called ‘Beasts Bounding Through Time’. While Bukowski’s poem is very comedic in tone and includes funny swipes at other artists, writers, philosophers, musicians and poets, my poem is a dark, romantic love poem about the dangers of being human but the rewards that it also brings.

    https://toofulltowrite.com/2016/04/25/napowrimo-day-25-the-ghost-of-a-burden-to-oblivion-by-david-ellis/

  26. […] NaPoWriMo Prompt – Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first one), but then goes elsewhere with it. This will work best if you just start with a line of poetry you remember, but without looking up the whole original poem. (Or, find a poem that you haven’t read before and then use a line that interests you).  The idea is for the original to furnish a sort of backdrop for your work, but without influencing you so much that you feel stuck just rewriting the original!. For example, you could begin, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day,” or “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons,” or “I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster,” or “they persevere in swimming where they like.” Really, any poem will do to provide your starter line – just so long as it gives you the scope to explore. Happy writing! […]

  27. […] Prompted by NaPoWriMo day 25 . The first line is by Theodore Roethke. You can read his whole poem […]

  28. Mar Claudrin says:

    I loved reading Olli Heikkonen’s poems, thanks for the recommendation.

    Today I decided to write another chain lune, and my poem begins with a line from a piece Gregory Orr wrote. Enjoyed this prompt, a lot. It was lovely revisiting favourite poems to choose a line :) xx

    http://notesfromabinbag.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/periphery-visions-in-hindsight.html

  29. […] The first stanza of this poem was written in the dark in the notebook I keep on my nightstand. I wasn’t sure where it was going to go, but by light of day this is what I came up with. I could have added many more stanzas with references to many more poets, but decided I needed to stop somewhere. This is for day #25 of NaPoWriMo. […]

  30. Off prompt again today, but I did write about other poets, so it’s close.

    https://lindakruschke.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/birth-of-a-poem/

  31. Ileea says:

    I chose the fantastic line “I want more landmarks, less landmines” by Richad Siken. Challenging but fun prompt!

    https://ileea.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/aprillyrik-dag-25-landmarken/

  32. […] Day Twenty-Three (Take Two) of 2016 NaPoWriMo. This is my reply to Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #27: San San. San San ~ 8 lines, rhyme pattern a,b,c,a,b,d,c,d                 ~ with 3 terms or images repeated 3 times each. The photo is the same one I used with a haiku (Blue Geese) earlier today when responding to  a photo challenge from Hugh’s Views & News. […]

  33. […] Today’s prompt is a bit of a classic creative writing starter: take a line from a poem and craft another poem from it – a poetic sculpture from the raw material.  After some thought – do I use a poem from William Baron, Edwin Waugh, Sam Bamford? – I’ve gone with a snippet from an “adventure” detailed in A Tour thro’ the whole island of Great Britain by Daniel Defoe written between 1724 – 1727 as it is quite a handy piece of place writing and historical account. (I think this escapade is from volume 3 but I’d have to check!)  After whinging about the weather, Defoe discovered how resilient his new Rochdale acquaintances were; they “had an extraordinary way of mixing the warm and the cold very happily” and, reading between the lines, that evening he partook of some of the plentiful “good ale” from the region.  The next morning, as the group ascended the steep hill up to Summit, they found themselves in the midst of a thundering snow storm and became disorientated as thick snow covered the track.  Defoe and his entourage perceived “a fearful precipice on one side, and uneven ground on the other”and nearly turned back.  (Perhaps, if they had, more beer may have been imbibed in order to sooth the nerves.) However, one of his servants reached the top of the hill and saw that the way into Yorkshire had “a plain way down on to the other side”.  Defoe’s tour continued with no harm coming to any of his party from the changeable weather of South Lancashire. […]

  34. Claire says:

    I struggled with the prompt today due to some extenuating circumstances! So a short, off-prompt poem https://clairevetica.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/tiger/

  35. […] have combined three recent NaPoRiMo prompts here: a sonnet, a mix of trad and mod, and continuing from an existing line (in this case […]

  36. […] prompt at NaPoWriMo.net was to pick a line from another poem and use that as a starter. Took a little rummaging to get […]

  37. Took a little rummaging to get outside something I would work too directly. So, how about a little Dr. Suess?

    but then if you can’t recall if that is
    a red-winged blackbird or eastern towhee

    http://www.quiltr.com/?p=14172

  38. housepoet says:

    Incredible work on here, always, but something about the mix and match poem on the Rhyme and Reason website Maureen posted at the start of today’s blog, just blows me away! Really a fun read! Thank you! I just loved reading it!

  39. […] prompt at NaPoWriMo.net was to pick a line from another poem and use that as a starter. Took a little rummaging to get […]

  40. colonialist says:

    I have taken leads from the last three prompts, just for fun. Thus I continue a famous first line, write a sonnet, and hopelessly mix up poetic pretentiousness with slang. It was fun.

  41. Eric erb says:

    Hello all. This challenge has been wonderful so far. Yesterday a song came to mind that I’d not ear’d in quite some time, then with today’s challenge it all became clear and this is what came out : https://erbiage.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/emotional-landscapes/

    Inspiration is Joga by Bjork. Icelandic, not finlandic. When I hear it I get such a different meaning out of the word ‘emergency’, not like a panic but an emergence. Not hurried, but coming out. Blooming. Both meaning of grave importance, one filled with wonder.

  42. […] off of this prompt to use a line from a favorite poem as the opening line for my own […]

  43. Katie Staten says:

    https://krstaten.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/napowrimo-25/

    Used Sylvia Plath’s “Lady Lazarus,” which is one of my all-time favorite poems.

  44. […] NaPoWriMo Day 25, where we were challenged to write a poem in which the opening lines come from another poem. I […]

  45. Angie says:

    “It’s no different here.” – Todd Davis’ Brushwolf

    spins off into my homeland poem about Kansas
    https://angieinspired.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/the-kingdom-of-cows/

  46. Oloriel says:

    No idea if I am late, and should probably end my streak of dark poems! :) I used “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”, by Robert Frost, to depict what happens to your dreams and wishes, if you do not tend to them.

    https://olorielmoonshadow.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/exile/

  47. […] thanks to NaPoWriMo.net for featuring my Austenland poem today! Today’s prompt, though, was to write a poem beginning […]

  48. […] I could get behind today’s prompt: pick the first line of a poem and build your poem from there. I thought of Robert Frost’s […]

  49. Vin says:

    I always liked Robert Frost’s works. The first line is taken from Acquainted with the Night.

    ‘One luminary clock against the sky’

    http://vinlitevin.com/maybe-poetry/time-flows-fast/

  50. I chose to write a Triolet poem based on the first line from “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost. My poem is titled “The Choice” https://leonaslines.com/2016/04/25/the-choice/

  51. […] Day 25 of NaPoWriMo 2016.  Today’s prompt is “to write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not […]

  52. S.G. Liput says:

    Inspired by The Social Network, I began my poem with a line from Longfellow’s “A Psalm of Life”:
    https://sgliput.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/the-social-network-2010/

  53. […] Day 25 of NaPoWriMo suggested beginning with a line from another poem. I chose a line from the song, Subversives. […]

  54. […] prompt to Day 25, NaPoWriMo 2016, where Maureen suggests beginning with the line from another […]

  55. […]  Image: Bus 89 by Jean-François Gornet, published under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0) license…. […]

  56. I got the poem written on the 25th, and posted on the 25th, but it’s now after Midnight here. It is a line from Alice Friman’s poem “The Trouble With Nightingales:” https://lylannemusselman.wordpress.com/2016/04/25/napowrimo-25-first-line/

  57. […] Today’s Na/GloPoWriMo2016 challenge – to write a poem that begins with a line from a another poem (not necessarily the first one), but then goes elsewhere with it. I’m continuing yesterday’s nonsense with a modern continuation of Edward Lear’s The Owl and the Pussy Cat. […]

  58. […] Day 25: Write a poem that begins with a line from another poem. I chose Lang Leav’s Three Questions. And coincidentally, the poem I wrote also works for… […]

  59. […] April 24 – Austenland (2013) – Honorable Mention (my featured poem) […]

  60. […] response to Daily Post: Scars and Napowrimo Day 25. (yes, I’m catching up! […]

  61. […] 25, 2016April 11, 2017 ~ Shannon Blood My NaPoWriMo Day 25 offering. Slightly off-prompt,  but more in the positioning, both poetical and political, I […]

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