Welcome back, all, for the 27th Day of NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo.

Today’s featured participant is Quest for Whirled Peas, where the call-and-response poem for Day 26 turned into a meditation on time!

Our poet in translation for Day 27 is Peru’s Luis Herndandez, whose selected poems, The School of Solitude, was recently published in English translation. His poems – often funny, and as often equally sad, were mostly written by hand in notebooks that he gave away to friends and even to strangers. Here’s one example that falls on the funny side of the equation, and five more can be found here. You can also look at images of the original notebooks here.

Finally, our prompt (optional, as always!) Today’s prompt comes to us from Megan Pattie, who points us to the work of the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who increasingly writes using very long lines. Carson has stated that his lines are (partly) based on the seventeen syllables of the haiku, and that he strives to achieve the clarity of the haiku in each line. So today, Megan and I collectively challenge you to write a poem with very long lines. You can aim for seventeen syllables, but that’s just a rough guide. If you’re having trouble buying into the concept of long lines, maybe this essay on Whitman’s infamously leggy verse will convince you of their merits. Happy writing!

 

79 Responses to Day Twenty-Seven

  1. Eric erb says:

    This challenge stopped me cold, and I had no idea what to do. I had thought last night, to write, about something I never thought of. But how can I do that?

    So in this block, the stuck place, I picked up my pad and let the words come. I’m surprised by this. Does it even work?

    https://erbiage.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/extreme-datacenter/

    Please tell me I’m not alone…

  2. Wrote this poem the evening of the 26th shortly after the prompt was posted; it’ll post shortly after midnight on the 27th.

    https://ordinaryaveragethoughts.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/national-poetry-writing-month-day-27/

  3. […] NaPoWriMo Day 27 is all about the long line in the style of Irish poet, Ciaran Carson. […]

  4. Pat R says:

    https://thoughtsandentanglements.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/writing/

    Good morning everyone..the home stretch is in view. Write on!

  5. […] Did not follow today’s prompt. If you want to check it out though, click here. […]

  6. […] for NaPoWriMo we are given the task of writing a poem with long lines. It is funny really as I struggled with […]

  7. Mar Claudrin says:

    I kept to the seventeen syllable line concept as well, just because I liked the extra constraint :) xx

    http://notesfromabinbag.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/scar-tissue.html

  8. […] NaPoWriMo prompt challenges us to write loooong lines. Poetic Asides prompt is “take […]

  9. […] Day 27 of NaPoWriMo In Pennsylvania, we voted in our primary presidential elections yesterday.  It inspired my “long lines” poem for the NaPoWriMo prompt. I strived for 17 syllables for each line to make mini-haiku-like poems with each. […]

  10. […] Day Twenty-Seven of 2016 NaPoWriMo. The five word prompts for The Secret Keeper’s Weekly Writing Prompt #34 are trip, fire, river, eye and melt. Image source: ©childofloth @ deviantart.com […]

  11. This prompt made me realize that the layout of my blog is a bit narrow.

    http://charlene-delfin.blogspot.com/2016/04/napowrimo-2016-27th-day.html

  12. […] Apologies to the purists as I “arranged” my lines in more poetic form today. It is after all, NaPoWriMo (national poetry writing month). Photo Credit: Mary […]

  13. […] NaPoWriMo 2016 – Day #27: “Long Lines” […]

  14. Katie Staten says:

    https://krstaten.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/napowrimo-27/

    Not atrociously long lines, but I was writing a pretty short poem and still wanted more than two or three lines in the poem as a whole.

  15. […] Today’s prompt: very long lines! (or maybe: a haiku in each line?) […]

  16. […] This poem meets two prompts, Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #28: Moonlight and the napowrimo.net Prompt for Day Twenty-Seven. Jane’s asks us to write a poem using the Edvard Munch painting Moonlight(1893) as […]

  17. […] NaPoWriMo’s “Long Lines prompt” NotaLiteraryJournal’s “Souvenirs prompt” Poetic Asides P-A-D “Take-off poems prompt” Poetry School’s “Apology for Imminent Action Prompt” Mariah Wilson’s “Myth prompt” QuillsEdge Press’ “From the Feet  prompt” Found Poetry’s “4 prompts from G. Santos” Apparatus Mag’s “Can’t Live W/out__ prompt” Jo Bell’s “Favorite music prompt” Indiana Humanities’ “Convergence prompt” Mary Carroll-Hackett’s “Old Ones prompt” Imaginary Garden’s “Way of Tea prompt” Lagan Press’ “Second Thoughts prompt” The Writer’s Center’s “Malfunctions prompt” […]

  18. […] NaPoWriMo Prompt – Today’s prompt comes to us from Megan Pattie, who points us to the work of the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who increasingly writes using very long lines. Carson has stated that his lines are (partly) based on the seventeen syllables of the haiku, and that he strives to achieve the clarity of the haiku in each line. So today, Megan and I collectively challenge you to write a poem with very long lines. You can aim for seventeen syllables, but that’s just a rough guide. If you’re having trouble buying into the concept of long lines, maybe this essay on Whitman’s infamously leggy verse will convince you of their merits. Happy writing! […]

  19. Realized anew what one of my blog theme’s biggest limitations is. I bet you can guess. ;) https://marilyncavicchia.com/2016/04/27/a-matter-for-my-own-heart-to-resolve/

  20. A piece of poetry in response to a Daily Post Prompt…
    Crossroads

  21. […] When it comes to grocery shopping, I’m a bona fied full-cart girl. Poetically, not so much: give me 12 items or less, some space, please. Wordy drawn-out sentences present me in southern drawl, chaos crawl. Whitman had his leaves, of grass, of nature’s beauty, of himself, of time. Me, I do not want to purr in thankfulness or vast benevolence. I want short sips of gratitude, long gulps of ardent skysong sigh-lence. If I have already confused you, you might as well stop reading now. It’s not gonna get any better as we trip along these  l o n g  lines. They’ve got all the time in the sky to spill, but I wouldn’t hold my breath. Each one is a wee slow death, and I long to breathe, and leave myself be. Hindsight might be 20/20, but we’ve got plenty of eyes to see. Seize the day they say and carpe diem to you, too, true blue – blue moon. I swoon over spaces, places to pillow my phrase, whimsy my way. Play is pithy; pity we don’t do it more, score ourselves some rare smiles. Some poets have miles and miles and miles to go, but I’m a soul sprinter. Splinter a phrase, fracture all fragments for days, skip the iambic, quick. Long lines are peanut butter on the roof of my mouth, laid on too thick. .. Written for NaPoWriMo, day 27.  […]

  22. […] longer-lined poem for NaPoWriMo day 27, inspired by a morning spent […]

  23. […] prompt, today, at NaPoWriMo is to experiment in using long lines in our poetry. After my work was complete, I debated […]

  24. Bryan Ens says:

    Thanks for featuring me! A very pleasant surprise!! My offering for today can be found at https://quest4peas.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/napowrimo-day-27-morning/

  25. Lori Gomez says:

    Well, I made the lines 17 syllables each to more fully participate in the madness, but my blog doesn’t allow them to stretch out into one long thread, so the formatting looks a bit askew, still long lines are my usual modus operandi. Cheers!

    https://ccthinks.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/when-i-know-that-i-know-that-i-know-napowrimo-day-27/

  26. Once again I’m off prompt. It’s not that I don’t like the prompts, I just sometimes have other things to write.

    https://lindakruschke.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/more-fun-than-a-slinky/

  27. David Ellis says:

    I used the prompt from here today and wrote a poem with seventeen syllables on each line that also consists of seventeen lines in total. I also used the ‘Take Off’ prompt from Writer’s Digest to inspire the theme and wrote the piece as a positive motivational poem.

    https://toofulltowrite.com/2016/04/27/napowrimo-day-27-gifts-of-eternal-light-by-david-ellis/

  28. Vijaya says:

    Hello!

    Here’s my Day 27 poem. I hope you like it!

    https://magicsurrealist2013.me/2016/04/27/long-lives-long-lines/

    Peace,

    Vijaya
    (Dreamer of Dreams)

  29. I got lost at lunch looking for a particular (and I’m quite sure not mythical) Shakespearian sonnet. No luck there but it did end up with a ramble of a different kind.

    Words strung one to one like cars commuting,
    sidling up and past and rearranging…

    http://www.quiltr.com/?p=14179

  30. […] NaPoWriMo Day 27 (actually, GloPoWriMo for those like me outside the U S of A) prompt challenges one to produce a […]

  31. […] prompt  was to write a poem of long lines. I like my lines long and rambly so this was good. I went with […]

  32. Misky says:

    I love American sentences. I hope you enjoy reading these.

    https://thirtydayspoetry.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/day-27-napowrimo/

  33. […] war die “NaPoWriMo-Aufgabe“, lange Verse zu verwenden, was sich erstmal ziemlich ungewöhnlich angefühlt hat. Ich rede […]

  34. […] Today’s prompt is to write poetry inspired by Ciaran Carson or Walt Whitman.  Essentially “leggier verse” than previous poems.  A bit experimental and the most “prog rock” title that I think I’ve ever used… […]

  35. […] to write a second poem for today, perhaps because I’m a little sad that NaPoWriMo2016 is coming to an end soon. This is my take on long-line […]

  36. Well, I had to give the prompt a try and wrote a second poem for today.

    https://lindakruschke.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/my-word-wall/

  37. […] NaPoWriMo prompt was to write a poem with long lines, so I used twenty-syllable lines in this meditation on […]

  38. S.G. Liput says:

    Here’s a meditation on the ocean with twenty-syllable lines:
    https://sgliput.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/waterworld-1995/

  39. Enjoyed this challenge–seemed hard at first but then my mind got going on it and it just seemed to write itself and go on and on–LOL! My version of Long Line Poetry is 19 lines–each line alternating with 19 and 17 syllables. I enjoyed creating this, my first long line poem titled “Long Lines” thanks for the challenge! https://leonaslines.com/2016/04/27/long-lines/

  40. […] sort of to the long sentence prompt, at Day 27, […]

  41. grapeling says:

    https://grapeling.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/there-was-not-time-for-tea-22/

    to prompt, and also to the prompt in the imaginary garden with real toads.

  42. […] today’s NaPoWriMo prompt we were encouraged to write a poem with long lines. We were given Whitman as an example; I took a […]

  43. Crow says:

    I just want everyone to know that this wasn’t my idea!
    https://wordsandfeathers.com/2016/04/27/spit-poem-20160427/

  44. Vin says:

    Didn’t count if the syllables fit.. just tried to write something longer than I usually do.

    http://vinlitevin.com/maybe-poetry/thoughts-of-a-search/

  45. […] Day 27 of NaPoWriMo 2016. Off-prompt today. Using a line from Billy Collins’ Canada for this […]

  46. Allie says:

    Today I wrote about having nothing to say. [= Enjoy. https://abm97.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/27-napowrimo-i-just-dont/

    Allie <3

  47. […] Today’s Na/GloPoWriMo2016 challenge – to write a poem with l..o..n..g lines (17 syllables!). Goodbye comfort zone. […]

  48. I like this technique! I merged it with a form called the bob:

    https://roomforrafflesia.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/wobble-chess/

  49. […] Day 27 of NaPoWriMo, off prompt today. […]

  50. […] response to Napowrimo Day 27. (yes, I’m catching up! […]

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