Welcome back, everyone, for the 23rd day of NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo. THere’s just one week left in our month of poems!

Today, we have two featured participants, because I just couldn’t choose between their Earth Day Poems for Day 22. First up is Thomas Tilton’s haiku recalling us to the effects of not taking care of the environment. Second, Clairvetica’s commingling of an Earth Day poem with an elegy for Prince.

Today’s poet in translation is Slovenia’s Taja Kramberger, who is both a poet and an anthropologist. A number of her poems, translated into English, can be found here, and six more can be found here.

Our poet in translation for Day 23 is:

And finally, our prompt (optional, as always). Today, I challenge you to write a sonnet. Traditionally, sonnets are 14-line poems, with ten syllables per line, written in iambs (i.e., with a meter in which an unstressed syllable is followed by one stressed syllable, and so on). There are several traditional rhyme schemes, including the Petrarchan, Spenserian, and Shakespearean sonnets. But beyond the strictures of form, sonnets usually pose a question of a sort, explore the ideas raised by the question, and then come to a conclusion. In a way, they are essays written in verse! This means you can write a “sonnet” that doesn’t have meet all of the traditional formal elements, but still functions as a mini-essay of a sort. The main point is to keep your poem tight, not rangy, and to use the shorter confines of the form to fuel the poem’s energy. As Wordsworth put it, in a very formal sonnet indeed, “Nuns fret not at their convent’s narrow room.” Happy writing!

 

85 Responses to Day Twenty-Three

  1. Claire says:

    Wow, I’m stoked to be featured today. Thank-you! :)

  2. mtw says:

    i’m back to writing poems after midnight! i forgot how challenging but rewarding sonnets are. iambic pentameter (the traditional meter for sonnets) actually aligns with the beat of a human heart, which i think is too incredible for words. that literal resonation, along with the recurring universal themes, certainly helps explain why classic poetry from the renaissance or romantic eras still manages to ring true centuries later.

    https://milestowrite.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/beautiful-destiny/

  3. […] prompt over at NaPoWriMo.net was to write a sonnet, something I’d never done before, so this is my first attempt at this […]

  4. […] napowrimo.net prompt is to write (ugh!) a sonnet. I know, I know—Shakespeare, blah blah […]

  5. Eric erb says:

    Ah the sonnet! The Cadillac of poetry, the engineering marvel of verse. I’ll often chafe at it’s boundaries, break it’s constraints, thinking I’m free. In that I’m wrong, for I know why the caged bird sings. When we fit and shape our words, only then do our ideas become keys, to fit the locks our minds have placed on our souls. Children must play randomly, adapting to the moment, inventing as they go, unknowingly building the tools and skills for whats to come. As they grow the refinement comes, focus, mastery develops. Thus, then, this sonnet I offer you, the journeyman bridge between apprentice and master, two out of three, getting there. https://erbiage.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/love-is-more-than-we-know/ your opinion matters so please comment. Let your light shine!

  6. Thomas Tilton says:

    Thrilled to be a featured participant today! Congrats to Clairvetica and everyone else who’s kept writing, kept going, through this year’s NaPoWriMo

  7. Vin says:

    This is my first attempt at anything even resembling a sonnet. I was unable to stop at 14 lines though, tried a lot to remove a line. But it had developed a mind of its own by that time and I was quite helpless.

    http://vinlitevin.com/maybe-poetry/so-many-smiles/

  8. TJ Paris says:

    If a sonnet is beyond you today you are welcome to join my weekly Haiku challenge which has been running for a year or so. Would love to see any haiku devotees drop by! Bon weekend!
    https://amaviedecoeurentier.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/tjs-household-haiku-jewel-box/

  9. TJ Paris says:

    This is a sonnet that I wrote for National Poetry day just a few days ago.
    https://amaviedecoeurentier.wordpress.com/2016/04/18/national-poetry-day/

  10. […] for NaPoWriMo we are to write a sonnet. Now this is way out of my comfort zone. I did write one previously for […]

  11. Angela says:

    I’m gathering courage to try a sonnet. Today brings 4 lines on perfectionism https://unassortedstories.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/positive-integer/

  12. […] everybody else is writing sonnets for NaPoWriMo. How could I not rise to the […]

  13. […] Day Twenty-Three of 2016 NaPoWriMo. The five word prompts for The Secret Keeper’s Weekly Writing Prompt #33 are plain, laugh, site, rock and secret. […]

  14. […] I’ve actually completed).  I am sharing this for the Apr.23 “Sonnet” prompt at NaPoWriMo, and will also share this next week for Open Link Night at […]

  15. Bryan Ens says:

    Please don’t be deterred by the fact that my piece is referred to as “Part VI”. Although it IS part of a larger work, it also stands completely alone. https://quest4peas.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/song-of-fire-part-vi-we-find-ourselves-in-a-delightful-spell-napowrimo-day-23/

  16. […] NaPoWriMo’s “Sonnet Challenge” NotaLiteraryJournal’s “If I Ran the World prompt” Poetic Asides P-A-D “Footwear Poems prompt” Poetry School’s “Ghazal Challenge” Mariah Wilson’s “Describe an Animal prompt” QuillsEdge Press’ “(Un)expected Journeys prompt” Found Poetry’s “Jouet’s petit récapitul portatif prompt” Apparatus Mag’s “Celestial Bodies/Skygazer prompt” Imaginary Garden’s “Things Shakespearean prompt” Lagan Press “Sunrise/Sunset prompt” Jo Bell’s “First Time prompt” Indiana Humanities’ “What You Like Best prompt” Mary Carroll-Hackett’s “Returning prompt” Kate Foley’s “Pride in a Weakness prompt” […]

  17. Vince Gotera says:

    Merging sonnet prompt with Poetic Asides’s “footwear.” Reminded me of something a friend from college wrote.

    Sonnet with Footwear Starting With
    Four Lines a College Buddy Wrote

     
          —for Keith Welsh
     
    “Whose shoes these are I think I know.
    His feet are in the village though.
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his shoes fill up with snow.”
     
    Thus my friend Keith began his ode
    That sadly did not mention a toad.
    In “Poetry” Miss Moore set the standard
    But in a garden! Not a road!
     
    No toad is bad enough but it’s a sin
    To set a poem outside of a garden,
    And in the woods by a road, no less!
    Oh Keith! How truly pedestrian!
     
    But I’ll forgive your sin, poetic vandal,
    So long as you replace “shoes” with “sandals.”

          —Vince Gotera

    http://vincegotera.blogspot.com … Come see the blog, also publishing daily April poems by friends.

  18. […] prompt  was to write a sonnet. *groan*. Ok, I’m tired, I’m grumpy, I’m not feeling […]

  19. […] prompt: a sonnet. Of course. I’m ditching the iambs right away because I always fail at meters, but I think […]

  20. Here are my sonnets for today. I’m having terrible problems with editing and formatting on WordPress today. Has anyone else had these problems? https://judydykstrabrown.com/2016/04/23/disappointment-three-sonnets/ (That title should read “Disappointing Will.”

  21. […] suggested by today’s NaPoWriMo.net prompt, although I’ve been working mostly with sonnets all month! Did you […]

  22. […] suggested by today’s NaPoWriMo.net prompt, although I’ve been working mostly with sonnets all month! Did you […]

  23. Kat Shamash says:

    My contributing poem is not a sonnet… I hope to gain the courage to write one soon. Here’s today’s poem from Kat Shamash entitled “March in China”
    http://shamash.typepad.com/shamash/2016/04/march-in-china.html

  24. Sonnets on day 23 felt oddly familiar! So how about a meta-sonnet-writing-sonnet?

    …Lay them out, line after line, save the file.
    Post them to the web, share them on facebook…

    http://www.quiltr.com/?p=14157

  25. […] Prompt: Today, I challenge you to write a sonnet. Traditionally, sonnets are 14-line poems, with ten syllables per line, written in iambs.You can write a “sonnet” that doesn’t have meet all of the traditional formal elements, but still functions as a mini-essay of a sort. […]

  26. […] Today’s National/Global Poetry Writing Challenge 2016 is completely appropriate to the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death – to write a sonnet. […]

  27. Kruti says:

    Since today is World Book Day, I chose to write my sonnet on the World of Books http://bit.ly/1WNrx5M
    Hope you enjoy it :)

  28. […] .. We’re writing sonnets over at NaPoWriMo today. Wanna […]

  29. David Ellis says:

    I used the prompt and wrote an inspirational English sonnet inspired by Shakespeare, true love and being passionate about your dreams. I did not use iambic pentameter this time but will incorporate the form into future sonnet efforts!

    https://toofulltowrite.com/2016/04/23/napowrimo-day-23-the-shadow-of-our-dreams-by-david-ellis/

  30. […] fiction, in 100 words or less (word count: 99).  The haiku that concludes the post is written for NaPoWriMo day 23.  Taken together, prose + haiku, they become a haibun.  Tohi is the Cherokee word for peace. […]

  31. […] going to cheat again though with another tanka. (Tomorrow: a lie in!) I’ll do today’s prompt tomorrow (Shakespeare’s birthday & all necessitates another […]

  32. […] NaPoWriMo 2016 -Day 23: “Sonnet“ […]

  33. […] Day 23 of NaPoWriMo 2016.  Prompt was to write a sonnet.  More than the form, “sonnets usually pose a question of a […]

  34. […] NaPoWriMo prompt was to write a sonnet, which can be considered an essay in verse. Thus, I chose a Spenserian […]

  35. S.G. Liput says:

    I went with a Spenserian sonnet about the growth of robotics:
    https://sgliput.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/time-of-eve-2010/

  36. […] Cause who doesn’t love a sonnet? Another one you can blame on NaPoWriMo.net. […]

  37. Didn’t have much time today, so I wrote the shortest sonnet I could manage. Five yards (that’s 15 feet, counting the title) and a cloud of dust.

    https://bagofanything.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/soon-gone/

  38. Eric erb says:

    How do you go about building one of these? One thing I did was to write down a bunch of possible rhymes for each stanza so I had as broad a pool as possible, which helped a bit.

    Next time I think I’ll write some streamofconsciousness around the topic first, rather than keep the theme in my head, and chip away at it from there. That would be sculpting a sonnet.

    What are your tricks/helpers for making sonnet?

  39. […] NaPoWriMo Prompt – Today, I challenge you to write a sonnet. Traditionally, sonnets are 14-line poems, with ten syllables per line, written in iambs (i.e., with a meter in which an unstressed syllable is followed by one stressed syllable, and so on). There are several traditional rhyme schemes, including the Petrarchan, Spenserian, and Shakespearean sonnets. But beyond the strictures of form, sonnets usually pose a question of a sort, explore the ideas raised by the question, and then come to a conclusion. In a way, they are essays written in verse! This means you can write a “sonnet” that doesn’t have meet all of the traditional formal elements, but still functions as a mini-essay of a sort. The main point is to keep your poem tight, not rangy, and to use the shorter confines of the form to fuel the poem’s energy. As Wordsworth put it, in a very formal sonnet indeed, “Nuns fret not at their convent’s narrow room.” Happy writing! […]

  40. A Shakespearean Sonnet in honor of Shakespeare’s Birthday, at least an attempt to write one anyway: https://lylannemusselman.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/napowrimo-23-sonnet/

  41. […] sonnet about garden wars for NaPoWriMo day 23 and the anniversary of Shakespeare’s […]

  42. […] Day 23 of NaPoWriMo celebrates Shakespeare by writing a sonnet.  I didn’t quite follow the iambic pentameter format, but I kept the line count and rhyme scheme. […]

  43. […] that I’m tired and therefore won’t be laboring through the sonnet that the NaPoWriMo prompt for today encouraged us to write.  Yep, too tired to think in iambic pentameter, and too tired to […]

  44. Gene says:

    A full day of traveling makes for some difficult sonnet writing. But here at the end of the day, a little reflection went a long way.

    https://genesmusings.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/angel-take-heart/

  45. Today’s prompt was a real challenge! I hadn’t attempted a Sonnet before and today I wrote my first one. I chose an English Sonnet form and I am really pleased how it turned out. Glad I tried to do it.
    Title: “A Declaration” https://leonaslines.com/2016/04/23/a-declaration/

  46. Vijaya says:

    Hi!

    I’m a little late in posting this today — been out all day.
    Here’s my very first Petrarchan sonnet:

    https://magicsurrealist2013.me/2016/04/23/curtain-close/

    Thanks for reading!
    Vijaya
    (Dreamer of Dreams)

  47. […] Day 23 of NaPoWriMo. Prompt: Write a sonnet. […]

  48. […] This is for the sonnet prompt: […]

  49. […] it to Day 23 prompt of […]

  50. Uniqusatya says:

    Oh good to know,i have got this well :
    heres my Italian sonnet
    https://uniqusatya.wordpress.com/2016/04/11/italian-sonnet/

  51. That was an awesome exercise in letting be – just write. Many thanks for the practice! Woohoo!

    https://roomforrafflesia.wordpress.com/2016/04/23/to-the-hideout/

  52. Eric erb says:

    So the idea of meter still eludes me, I think I need to read more.
    I didn’t want to change my april sonnet, so I wrote a new one

    https://erbiage.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/a-sonnet-on-boundaries/

  53. […] Day 23: NaPoWriMo proposed adventures in sonnet-land which I am respectfully declining in pursuit of more quintrain poetry — I like how it complements my photography. […]

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